Farsighted not a typical YA novel

I don’t do a lot of book reviews, probably because I am working on a novel myself. However, I do like to share books I come across that turn out to be really good. Farsighted by Emlyn Chand is one of those books.

So what’s it about? Farsighted tells the story of Alex, a typical teenage boy. Well, maybe not so typical. You see, Alex is blind. But at the beginning of the novel, he’s starting to think he’s about to begin having a normal life. And for all intents and purposes, he is completely normal. He’s concerned with what most teen boys are concerned with: being cool, not being made fun of, raging hormones and girls.

There’s just one problem with Alex’s plan, though. When he starts having visions, his whole world goes topsy-turvy. They strike without any notice and begin to lead him down a path that sets him up to save a girl that he’s grown close to.

Chand was seriously brave to write this book the way she did. The words come from Alex himself, first person, so you are immediately thrown into his environment. As Alex is blind, Chand has to describe everything in terms of how Alex hears, feels and smells them. That’s a gutsy move for an author, but I found that this gets you inside Alex’s mind in a way that I’d never seen written before. It just works. And when Alex begins to have visions, both the reader and Alex are confused as to what is real and what isn’t. I, obviously, loved that. Eventually, both the reader and Alex learn to determine what is a vision and what is not, but it’s this method of storytelling that is so effective in making you feel as if you ARE Alex.

The other characters are equally as intriguing. Simmi, the girl that Alex describes as smelling like Almond Joy, is the girl Alex has to save. It was Alex’s father, however, that interested me the most. And without giving anything away, I found myself surprised by the angle his part of the story ended up taking.

This book was intended for a younger reader than me, so it’s light on any sexual innuendo or language. Chand has a very good way of writing with Alex’s own voice, so it’s almost like having a conversation with a teenager. Maybe that wouldn’t appeal to some, but I think it’s a good read for both young adults and older adults alike.

I am looking forward to future books about Alex and his adventures.

Farsighted is available for free to Amazon Prime members for Kindle or just for a mere $2.99 otherwise. I recommend giving it a read.

One thought on “Farsighted not a typical YA novel

  • March 14, 2012 at 7:06 am
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    Wow, thank you for the incredible review, Robin! I’m so glad you gave love to Alex’s dad, Greg. Usually, people focus on either Alex or Shapri, but I love Greg, too! He has a really elaborate back story, and I’m toying with the idea of a prequel from his POV. Still trying to decide whether it’s a good idea. What do you think?

    Would you mind cross-posting this review to Amazon and GoodReads? Every bit helps new authors like me get noticed. I appreciate it so very, very much.Oh, and if you’d like an ARC of Open Heart, just visit http://www.emlynchand.com and sign-up for my mailing list (I’ll have Nook copies, too).Thanks a mil,Emlyn 😀

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