Much ado about fandom

As many of you know (especially if you follow me on Twitter), I have been vacationing in Paris this week. But part of my Parisian journey involved getting a ticket early on to a production of “Much Ado About Nothing” with David Tennant and Catherine Tate, two of my favorite people on the planet.

And so yesterday, I hopped on the Eurostar and went under The English Channel and arrived in London solely for the purpose to go to the Wyndams Theatre.

The play itself was wonderful and David and Catherine did not disappoint. They have always had an amazing chemistry that just works well together. It was honestly probably one of the funniest things I’ve seen, not only on stage, but in entertainment, in general. I laughed so hard that by intermission, I was running towards the bathrooms because I had very nearly peed myself.

But I was also emotional. Here were two people I admired so very much. Right in front of me. Entertaining ME, of all people.

However, I guess that almost wasn’t enough.

So here’s my story of how I didn’t get to meet either of my personal heroes.

After the show, I made my way to the stage door. I had not anticipated the crowd there, though. But I thought I could manage getting my program signed. I mean, how hard could it be?

Apparently, it’s next to impossible. Unless you actually don’t go to the play and wait outside during it. Which is exactly what some people did. Which, honestly, irked me. Here are all these people standing in front of me, without a thing to sign – no tickets, no programs. All just trying to get a photo of David Tennant and/or Catherine Tate. And here am I, and the other actual theatre-goers behind them, not able to get anywhere near the stars.

And so that’s what happened. I suppose I could have been more aggressive and I was actually surprised at how far I’d managed to squeeze in. But I do draw a line at rudeness (believe me, some people do not). I did see David and never took out my camera (I couldn’t bring myself to do it) because in all my naivete, I thought that surely once people got stuff signed and their photos, they’d move out of the way.

But no, they just stayed there and kept taking photos and shoving things at David and Catherine (who only came out briefly, but I was under the impression from the curtain call that she might not have been feeling well – I recognized the half smile she gave as she took her bows. I have been there. Oh, have I been there).

So I did not get a signed program. But that wasn’t the point. All I really wanted was to shake their hands and tell them thank you. Because I owe them both so much and for getting me through a difficult time in my life as The Doctor and Donna. And that was unexpectedly important to me.

But it wasn’t meant to be. And I left the theatre severely disapointed.

This is where I get brutally honest. I left the theatre with tears in my eyes. Two trips across the Atlantic and I still haven’t even been able to get close enough to Mr. Tennant to mutter a single “Thank you.”

I was very happy to get back to Paris after that experience. I was disappointed in myself, most of all, for letting something like that become so important to me. Because it’s ludicrous to think that it really matters. I’m still a huge fan of both actors and it won’t change my feelings, but I still feel let down from that one little incident.

I am not a celebrity hound, obviously, so I guess I was completely out of my element. But then again, I don’t want to shove and push and be an animal just for another human being. Because that’s not who I am either.

Interestingly enough, the entirety of London was a madhouse last night, so maybe it was something in the air. And it rained. Again. Just like it did when I waited by the stage door for my Doctor to show up when I saw “Hamlet,” only to get back to the hotel room later to hear he’d announced his departure from Doctor Who.

I arrived back in Paris to a tweet from John Barrowman that he had been hanging out in a bar not to far away from the apartment where I’m staying. How’s that for irony?

And even worse? I know the entire plot of the new Doctor Who episode because everyone thought it was nice to post spoilers of the entire episode.

But I forgave them, because while they were sitting at home watching their television, I was seeing David Tennant and Catherine Tate IN THE FLESH. And because of that superiority, I felt better.

4 thoughts on “Much ado about fandom

  • October 9, 2011 at 1:52 pm
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    I can relate 100% to your experience. The cost of the tickets and a trip to London gave me only one oportunity to see the show, and though I was one of the first out of the theatre, the stage door barrier was¬†already three deep in fans. Yes, a lot of people who hadn’t seen the play got photos and autographs. I tried to take a few photos, but people kept getting in the way or raising their arms just when I could see a bit of one of the stars. Unfortunately, I find it’s the last part of a day out that shades your perception of an event, and that was far from the ending I wanted.

    • October 10, 2011 at 3:06 pm
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      Oh! Someone who feels my pain! I was so disappointed and felt even worse for almost breaking into tears right there behind the theatre. I kept saying “But I came all the way from America!!!!” It just wasn’t fair.

      But I did really enjoy the play. I don’t believe I’ve laughed that hard in a very long time.

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